About website data

Data levels

The Quality Indicators for the Learning and Teaching (QILT) website is divided into two distinct areas:

  1. Institutions – This section allows users to compare overall results for up to six institutions.
  2. Study Area – This section allows users to select a study area, from a list of 21, and then compare results for that study area for up to six institutions.

Information provided on the QILT website is calculated at the study area level. Students doing a combined or double degree are generally counted more than once if their major courses are in different study areas.

The 21 different study areas used on the website have been compiled based on the Australian Standard Classification of Education (ASCED), which groups higher education courses, specialisations and units of study with the same or similar vocational emphasis. The ASCED field of education classification provides a hierarchical structure with groupings at three levels as follows:

  • Level I: 11 broad fields of education (2 digit code)
  • Level II: 83 narrow fields of education (4 digit code including the relevant Level I code)
  • Level III: 439 detailed fields of education (6 digit code including the relevant Level I and Level II codes)

The relationship between the study areas used on this website (code and study area name) and ASCED field of education classification (broad field of education and narrow/detailed field of education) is shown below:

Code

Study area name

Broad field of education

Narrow/detailed field of education

01

Science and mathematics

01 Natural and Physical Sciences

0101 (Mathematical Sciences), 0103 (Physics and Astronomy), 0105 (Chemical Sciences), 0107 (Earth Sciences), 0109 (Biological Sciences), 0199 (Other Natural & Physical Sciences), 010000 (Natural & Physical Sciences)

02

Computing and information systems

02 Information Technology

0201 (Computer Science), 0203 (Information Systems), 0299 (Other Information Technology), 020000 (Information Technology)

03

Engineering

03 Engineering and Related Technologies

0301 (Manufacturing Engineering and Technology), 0303 (Process and Resources Engineering), 0305 (Automotive Engineering and Technology), 0307 (Mechanical and Industrial Engineering and Technology), 0309 (Civil Engineering), 0311 (Geomatic Engineering - includes Surveying), 0313 (Electrical and Electronic Engineering and Technology), 0315 (Aerospace Engineering and Technology), 0317 (Maritime Engineering and Technology), 0399 (Other Engineering and Related Technologies), 030000 (Engineering and Related Technologies)

04

Architecture and building

04 Architecture and Building

0401 (Architecture and Urban Environment), 0403 (Building), 040000 (Architecture and Building)

05

Agriculture and environmental studies

05 Agriculture, Environmental and Related Studies

0501 (Agriculture), 0503 (Horticulture and Viticulture), 0505 (Forestry Studies), 0507 (Fisheries Studies), 0509 (Environmental Studies), 0599 (Other Agriculture, Environmental and Related Studies), 050000 (Agriculture, Environmental and Related Studies)

06

Health services and support

06 Health

0609 (Optical Science), 0613 (Public Health), 0615 (Radiography), 061700 (Rehabilitation Therapies), 061705 (Chiropractic & Osteopathy), 061707 (Speech Pathology), 061709 (Audiology), 061711 (Massage Therapy), 061713 (Podiatry), 061799 (Rehabilitation Therapies n.e.c.), 0619 (Complementary Therapies), 0699 (Other Health), 060000 (Health)

07

Medicine

06 Health

0601(Medical Studies)

08

Nursing

06 Health

0603 (Nursing)

09

Pharmacy

06 Health

0605 (Pharmacy)

10

Dentistry

06 Health

0607 (Dental Studies)

11

Veterinary science

06 Health

0611(Veterinary Studies)

12

Rehabilitation

06 Health

061701 (Physiotherapy), 061703 (Occupational Therapy)

13

Teacher education

07 Education

0701 (Teacher Education), 0703 (Curriculum and Education Studies), 0799 (Other Education), 070000 (Education)

14

Business and management

08 Management and commerce

09 Society and Culture

0801(Accounting), 0803 (Business and Management), 0805 (Sales and Marketing), 0809 (Office Studies), 0811 (Banking, Finance and Related Fields), 0899 (Other Management and Commerce), 080000 (Management and Commerce), 0919 (Economics and Econometrics)

15

Humanities, culture and social sciences

09 Society and Culture

0901 (Political Science and Policy Studies), 0903 (Studies in Human Society), 0913 (Librarianship, Information Management and Curatorial Studies), 0915 (Language and Literature), 0917 (Philosophy and Religious Studies), 0999 (Other Society and Culture), 090000 (Society and Culture)

16

Social work

09 Society and culture

0905 (Includes Social Work and Counselling)

17

Psychology

09 Society and culture

0907 (Includes Psychology and Behavioural Science)

18

Law and paralegal studies

09 Society and culture

0909 (Law), 0911(Justice and Law Enforcement)

19

Creative arts

10 Creative Arts

1001 (Includes Music, Dance and Theatre Studies, Dance, Performing Arts n.e.c.), 1003 (Visual Arts and Crafts), 1005 (Graphic and Design Studies), 1099 (Other Creative Arts), 100000 (Creative Arts)

20

Communications

10 Creative Arts

1007 (Includes Journalism)

21

Tourism, hospitality, personal services, sport and recreation

08 Management and commerce

09 Society and culture

11 Food, Hospitality and Personal Services

0807 (Tourism), 0921 (Sport and Recreation), 1101 (Food and Hospitality), 1103 (Personal Services), 110000 (Food, Hospitality and Personal Services), 1201 (General Education Programs), 1203 (Social Skills Programs), 1205 (Employment Skills Programs), 1299 (Other Mixed Field Programs), 120000 (Mixed Field Programs)

If the total number of survey participants across the relevant survey years combined is less than 25, then survey results will not be published, and the website will display the message ‘Numbers of survey responses too low’ or ‘L/N’. For example, if for a particular survey 15 survey results were received in the first year of data pooling and 20 in the second year, then survey results would be published since a total of 35 responses have been received. If, however, only 10 results were received in each of the two years of data pooling, then results would not be published as the total number of responses received is fewer than 25. True zero values will always be reported as ‘0’, that is where more than 25 responses have been received and the score for the indicator is zero per cent.

If data is not available, the website will display the message ‘Survey data does not exist’ or ‘N/A’. In some instances, the website will display data for a particular institution and study area for either graduate employment/graduate satisfaction or student experience, but not the other. This is because the former Australian Graduate Survey calculates results based on a graduate’s self-reported major area of study, while the Student Experience Survey and Graduate Outcomes Survey in general use the program study area recorded by the institution. Sometimes a graduate’s self-reported major area of study may differ from the program study area recorded by the institution.

All data is updated annually, but results are based on surveys from more than one year to improve the reliability of the information. Percentage scores are calculated after data is pooled at the unit record level. For example, if a study area recorded 5 graduates employed based on 10 responses in the first year of data pooling, and 24 graduates employed based on 40 responses in the second year of data pooling, the published employment indicator would be 58 per cent (total of 29 employed out of 50 responses), not 45 per cent (the average of 50 per cent employed in year one and 60 per cent employed in year two).

Data Year

Student experience, undergraduate level only ( Student Experience Survey)

Two years of data is pooled from students who were in the first year or later year of their course in 2015 and 2016. Learner Engagement results exclude “External” and “Distance” student responses.

Graduate employment outcomes, undergraduate and postgraduate coursework levels (Australian Graduate Survey (2014-2015) and Graduate Outcomes Survey (2016))

Three years of data is pooled from graduates who completed their courses in 2013–2015 and were surveyed in 2014–2016.

Graduate satisfaction, undergraduate and postgraduate coursework levels (Course Experience Questionnaire)

Two years of data is pooled from graduates who completed their courses in 2014–2015 and were surveyed in 2015–2016.


The QILT website gives indicative confidence intervals for all survey indicators which are discussed in the sections below. Confidence intervals reflect the accuracy of the estimates and the degree of confidence we can have in those estimates. A 90% confidence interval means that 90 times out of 100, the true value will fall within the upper and lower confidence intervals. A survey with a small number of participants will have a larger confidence interval and a survey with a large number of participants will have a smaller confidence interval.

A confidence interval graph has the following key features:

Snapshot of a graph showing confidence bars.  Words 'Upper limit of 90% confidence interval', 'average response' and 'lower limit of 90% confidence interval'

National averages have been applied across all indicators on the website, and are available in both chart and table format. The national average is calculated using data from all survey responses pooled at the national level, in the same way that overall institution results are calculated using data pooled at the institution level.

For most indicators, the national average is calculated as the arithmetic mean of all survey results. One indicator, salaries of graduates employed full-time, instead reports the national result as the median value of all survey responses. This represents the 'middle ground' of graduate salaries. The median is used because salaries earned by graduates are unevenly spread.

For further information on the calculation of indicators, see the following pages:

Student experience

Graduate employment

Graduate satisfaction

The QILT website displays the national average for a selected study area, as well as for overall institutional results. On graphs which include only one study area, the national average of the study area is represented by a thin grey line across the institutional results, see Figure 1.

Chart showing the Overall quality of education experience, with both National Average and an Institution that is higher than the national average

On tables, the national average is represented in a separate column.A table that is available when comparing institutions.  This table is demonstrating that the National Average is also displayed when reading figures.  The exact figures in this picture are not relevant.

When examining multiple institutions’ estimates, the estimates can’t be directly compared as they are survey estimates only and not the true value. Instead the confidence intervals should be compared to determine if the confidence intervals overlap. The two possible scenarios of overlapping and non-overlapping confidence intervals are shown below with interpretations of what they mean.

Graph showing two columns with confidence level indicators.  The confidence level indicators overlap.

In Figure 1, the 90% confidence intervals overlap therefore it cannot be concluded with a 90% level of confidence that there is a difference between the two institutions.

Graph showing two columns with confidence level indicators.  The confidence level indicators do not overlap.

In Figure 2, the 90% confidence intervals do not overlap therefore it can be concluded with a 90% level of confidence that the indicator in the first institution is lower than that in the second institution.

Student Experience

This data is sourced from the Student Experience Survey (SES).

The six indicators from the SES displayed on this website each show the percentage of students who rated various aspect of their higher education experience positively.

The indicators relate to:

  1. Overall quality of educational experience
  2. Teaching quality
  3. Learner engagement
  4. Learning resources
  5. Student support
  6. Skills development

Care should be taken when interpreting results from the SES provided on this website. The results are estimates only, because they are based on a survey which was not completed by all students. The accuracy of the figures varies depending on the number of students who completed the survey. Confidence intervals are displayed to provide a measure of accuracy of the estimates.

SES data on this website includes responses from both domestic and international on-shore undergraduates.

Graduate Satisfaction

This data is sourced from the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ). Three indicators from the CEQ are displayed on this website. The indicators relate to:

Three indicators from the CEQ are displayed on this website. The indicators relate to:

  1. Overall satisfaction
  2. Good teaching
  3. Generic skills

Care should be taken when interpreting results from the CEQ provided on this website. The results are estimates only, because they are based on a survey which was not completed by all graduates. The accuracy of the figures varies depending on the number of graduates who completed the survey. Confidence intervals are displayed to provide a measure of accuracy of the estimates.

Graduate Employment

This data is sourced from the Graduate Destinations Survey (GDS)  for 2014-15 and the Graduate Outcomes Survey (GOS) for 2016. Four indicators of graduate outcomes are displayed on this website. The indicators relate to:

  1. Graduates in full-time employment
  2. Graduates in overall employment
  3. Graduates in full-time study
  4. Median salary of graduates in full-time employment

Care should be taken when interpreting results from the GDS and GOS provided on this website. The results are estimates only, because they are based on a survey which was not completed by all graduates. The accuracy of the figures varies depending on the number of graduates who completed the survey. Confidence intervals are displayed to provide a measure of accuracy of the estimates.

Graduate outcomes data on this website only includes responses from Australian resident graduates. Data is displayed separately for graduates from undergraduate and postgraduate coursework level degrees.

Employer satisfaction

Information on the QILT website about employer satisfaction is sourced from the Employer Satisfaction Survey (ESS).

The ESS is undertaken by asking employed graduates who participated in the Graduate Outcomes Survey (GOS) four months after graduation to provide the contact details of their supervisor for follow up. The survey provides information about the quality of education provided at Australian institutions, by asking supervisors to provide feedback about the generic skills, technical skills and work readiness of the graduate employed in their workplace.

 

Over 3,000 workplace supervisors of recent graduates of all levels participated in the ESS in 2016, making it the largest ever Australian survey of employers of higher education graduates. While there are an insufficient number of responses to publish institution by study area results on the QILT website, the ESS is large enough to provide comparisons by broad field of education, type of institution, course characteristics, employment characteristics, occupation and demographic group.

Six indicators of employer satisfaction are displayed on this website. The indicators relate to:

  1. Overall satisfaction
  2. Foundation skills
  3. Adaptive skills
  4. Collaborative skills
  5. Technical skills
  6. Employability skills

Care should be taken when interpreting results from the 2016 ESS presented on this website. The results are estimates only, because they are based on a survey which was not completed by all supervisors.