Glossary

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A

Australian Standard Classification of Education (ASCED)
– comprised of two component classifications, Level of Education and Field of Education. It provides a basis for comparable administrative and statistical data on educational activities and attainment classified by level and field.

B

Broad Field of Education (BFOE)
– broad field of education categories are used by the Department of Education for reporting higher education statistics. They are coded from the field of education code associated with the course undertaken by a graduate. Please refer to the Field of Education classifications on the Higher Education Information Management System (HEIMS) website.

C

Confidence intervals
– reflect the accuracy of the estimates and the degree of confidence we can have in those estimates. A 90% confidence interval means that 90 times out of 100, the true value will fall within the upper and lower confidence intervals.
Coursework
– written, oral or practical work completed by a student during a course of study, usually assessed in order to count towards a final mark or grade.
Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ)
– a questionnaire completed by graduates of Australian higher education institutions approximately four months after completion of their courses. This survey provides information about the quality of the education provided within Australian institutions. The survey asks graduates to what extent they agree with a series of statements about their study experiences. The survey asks graduates to respond to a series of questions related to their experiences regarding particular topics.

D

Disability
– this indicates whether the graduate has a disability, impairment or long term medical condition as defined by data element E386 on the Higher Education Information Management System (HEIMS) website.

E

Employer Satisfaction Survey (ESS)
– a survey that measures the quality of education provided within individual Australian institutions. This survey asks supervisors to provide feedback about the generic skills, technical skills and work readiness of the graduate employed in their workplace.

F

Full-time employment
– this includes domestic graduates who were usually or actually in paid-employment for at least 35 hours per week as a proportion of those who were available for full time work in the week before the survey. This figure includes graduates who were working full-time and undertaking full time or part time study.

Full-time employment median salary
– this is the gross median salary from all jobs for domestic graduates working full time in Australia, excluding outliers, i.e. very high and very low salaries.  

G

Graduate Destinations Survey (GDS)
– a survey that has been completed by graduates of Australian higher education institutions approximately four months after completion of their courses. The GDS provides information on the labour market outcomes and further study activities of graduates. The GDS was superseded by the GOS in 2016.
Graduate Outcomes Survey (GOS)
– a survey that is completed by graduates from Australian higher education institutions approximately four months after completion of their course. This survey provides information on the labour market outcomes and further study activities of graduates that year.
Graduate Outcomes Survey - Longitudinal (GOS-L)
– supplements the Graduate Outcomes Survey by measuring the medium-term employment outcomes of higher education graduates, approximately three years after they have completed their course. The GOS-L is based on a cohort analysis of graduates who responded to the Graduate Destinations Survey.
Graduate Employment
– an indicator on the QILT website, this is an outcome sourced from the Graduate Destinations Survey (GDS) and the Graduate Outcomes Survey (GOS). They provide information on the labour market outcomes and further study activities of graduates. Both the GDS and the GOS surveys are completed by graduates from Australian higher education institutions approximately four months after course completion.
Graduate Satisfaction
– an indicator on the QILT website. Graduate satisfaction is sourced from the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ). It measures a student’s satisfaction with the quality of education provided by their institution (e.g. overall satisfaction, good teaching practices, generic skills gained).

H

Home language
– this indicates whether the graduate uses a language other than English at the person's permanent home residence, as defined by data element E348 on the Higher Education Information Management System (HEIMS) website. Please also refer to the Australian Standard Classification of Languages (ASCL) on the ABS website.

I

Indicators
– statistics used to measure current conditions as well as to forecast financial or economic trends.
Institution
– an organisation that provides a higher, post-secondary and/or tertiary education.

J

K

L

Labour force participation rate
– this includes domestic graduates who were available for employment in the week before the survey as a proportion of all domestic graduates responded to the survey. This figure includes graduates who were available for employment and undertaking full time or part time study.

M

Medium-term
– medium term graduate outcome data are sourced from the Graduate Outcome Survey- Longitudinal (GOS-L). GOS-L measures the outcomes of higher education graduates based on a cohort analysis of graduates approximately three years after they completed their course. The GOS-L is an ongoing part of the Quality Indicators for Learning and Teaching (QILT) survey suite, commissioned by the Australian Government Department of Education. For further details about the GOS-L.

N

National average
– calculated using data from all survey responses, these responses were pooled at a national level, in the same way overall institution results are calculated using data pooled at the institution level.

O

Occupation group
– occupation groups as coded from the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO).
Overall employment rate
– this includes domestic employed graduates (full-time and part-time) as a proportion of those who were available for employment in the week before the survey. This figure includes graduates who were employed and undertaking full time or part time study.

P

Postgraduate
– a student enrolled in but not yet completed or graduated from a graduate certificate, graduate diploma or masters degree.

Q

Quality Indicators for Learning and Teaching (QILT)
– an Australian Government program that brings survey data together from Australian institutions to help students make the best choice for their future study. The QILT website allows students to compare the quality of learning and teaching in different Australian higher education institutions. These comparisons can be generated between different institutions or by study areas.

R

S

Short-term
– short-term graduate outcomes data are sourced from the Graduate Outcome Survey (GOS). GOS measures the outcome of higher education graduates approximately four to six months after they completed their course. It is a census of all in scope graduates and is administered under the Quality Indicators for Learning and Teaching (QILT) initiative, commissioned by the Australian Government Department of Education.
Social Research Centre (SRC)
– the information on this website is sourced by SRC from research undertaken and then presented for the purpose of disseminating information for the benefit of the public.
Socio economic status
– this indicator refers to the socio-economic status of the graduate, as defined by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) Socio-Economic Indexes of Areas (SEIFA) Index of Education and Occupation
Student Experience Survey (SES)
– the only comprehensive survey of current higher education students in Australia. The six indicators from the SES displayed on the QILT website each show the percentage of students providing positive feedback on various aspects of their higher education experience.
Study areas
– compiled based on the Australian Standard Classification of Education (ASCED), which groups higher education courses, specialisations and units of study with the same or similar vocational emphasis. The QILT website lists 21 different study areas to compare.
Study Assist
– a website that provides information about Australian Government assistance for tertiary study including information about subsidised fees and government loans. This website also contains information about institutions, income support and details on how to be a knowledgeable student.

T

U

Undergraduate
– a student enrolled in and who has not yet completed or graduated from a diploma, advanced diploma, associate degree or a bachelor degree.

V

W

X

Y

Z